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military history


  • Robert E. Lee Wasn't a Hero, He Was a Traitor

    by Michael McLean

    Lee was no hero. He was neither noble nor wise. Lee was a traitor who killed United States soldiers, fought for human enslavement, vastly increased the bloodshed of the Civil War, and made embarrassing tactical mistakes. 


  • The Whistleblowers of the My Lai Massacre

    by Howard Jones

    Evidence—and history—ultimately showed that an Army cover-up took place after the massacre. We know about it because of a single whistleblower and his two crewmates.


  • The World War I Battle That Didn't End with Armistice Day: Hunger

    by William Lambers

    Even after the Armistice of November 11, 1918 ending World War One, American soldiers were carrying out heroic missions. Lieutenant Orville C. Bell and officers in the American Relief Administration saved civilians in Montenegro from starvation. 



  • New research sheds light on largest-ever Anglo-Saxon treasure hoard

    The impressive find is now thought to include artifacts captured from kingdoms in East Anglia and Northumbria -- something researchers say "offers vivid confirmation of the widespread and brutal events" between warring English kingdoms, which have been described in near-contemporary sources from the period.


  • Churchill and Stalin: Comrades-in-Arms during World War Two

    by Geoffrey Roberts

    Neither the formation of what Churchill later called the Grand Alliance nor its collapse was inevitable. The Grand Alliance was willed into existence by its leaders and then sustained through four years of total war. It was one the most successful alliances in history. 



  • Killing Me Softly with Militarism

    by William J. Astore

    Besides TV shows, movies, and commercials, there are many signs of the increasing embrace of militarized values and attitudes in this country. The result: the acceptance of a military in places where it shouldn’t be, one that’s over-celebrated, over-hyped, and given far too much money and cultural authority, while becoming virtually immune to serious criticism.


  • An Act of Betrayal and Infamy

    by Alon Ben-Meir

    To think that the President would sell America’s interests and abandon its allies for the sake of personal financial gain is not merely outrageous but criminal.