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Historians/History


  • Stonewall's Legacy and Kwame Anthony Appiah's Misuse of History

    by Alan Singer

    What Appiah misses in his dismissal of the Stonewall Rebellion’s historical importance is that symbols like Rosa Parks sitting down and Stonewall are crucial to social movements as they mobilize and move from the political margins to the center of civic discourse.


  • Why We Need Better Children's History Books

    by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

    Assembling a coherent narrative that inspires students to image a different world is much more complicated than a Wikipedia search. Teachers can only carry out this task if they have access to narrative histories that are decolonized.


  • The Perfect Mentor: Alan Brinkley

    by Yanek Mieczkowski

    Beyond his impeccable scholarship and insightful lectures, Alan Brinkley was a mentor to dozens of doctoral students. In that role, he was perfect, providing profound lessons that will last through many careers, and likely, many lifetimes. 


  • Ideologies and U.S. Foreign Policy International History Conference: Day 2 Coverage

    by Miriam Lipton

    What was the global significane of the Civil War? What exactly is the definition of “freedom?” How are Donald Duck, Indiana Jones, and anti-modernizationistsconnected? The second day of the Ideologies and U.S. Foreign Policy International History Conference was highlighted by experts’ bold answers to these ambitious questions.


  • The Origins of the Lost Cause Myth

    by M. Andrew Holowchak

    States’ rights and slavery, while theoretically distinct, were in praxis intertwined. Here's what a Jeffersonian analysis of Jubal Early’s lost-cause apologia can teach us.


  • Material History and A Victorian Riddle Retold

    by Amy G. Richter

    A historian of nineteenth-century American culture, I study the significance ordinary women and men gave to furniture, art, and decoration. Recently my mother's dementia challenged my scholarship by reminding me of the personal meanings of objects and the intimate work they do.